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Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Casting Heavy Flies

By April 5, 2014 No Comments

Tips for Fly Casting with Heavy Flies Heavy flies and fly fishing rigs like nymphs and streamers can sometimes be difficult to cast, especially when you are fishing with a strike indicator or more than one fly.  Nymphs or streamers can easily tangle leaders or even break a rod if they hit the rod on the forward cast.  Here a couple of tips from our expert fly fishing guides to help you avoid problems when casting a heavy fly or more than one fly at a time. 1- Open Up Your Casting Loop:  Most of the time when casting you try to keep the line going straight forward and back to keep as much power and distance in your cast.  By casting straight forward and back you create a tight loop.  With heavy flies if you do not have just enough power in your cast or the correct timing a tight loop can easily collapse on itself, tail, and get tangled.  Also, with a straight forward and back cast you are more likely to hit your rod with the fly.  We recommend arching your cast a little bit more than normal when casting nymphs and streamers.  You will lose a little bit of power, but your loop will open a little bit and you will be less likely to tangle your line or hit your rod with your fly. 2- False Cast As Little As Possible:  Even the best fly-fishermen can get tangled or hit their own rod when casting heavy flies or a multiple fly setup.  The best way to avoid getting tangled or damaging your rod is to false cast as little as possible by using alternative casts such as roll casting or the water load cast.  Water load casting can be done by using the river current to be your back cast. When finishing your drift allow your fly to drag down river behind you, lift your rod tip, and then flip your fly upstream by throwing your rod forward like you are casting. Using a roll cast or water load cast will help you avoid tangling your line and damaging your rod when casting nymph or streamer rigs. 3- Accentuate the Pause on Your Backcast: When you are casting heavy rigs or heavy flies it becomes increasingly important to get the timing of your cast right. A common error many anglers make is beginning the forward cast too early. If you do this with a lot of weight on the end of the leader you run the risk of ruining your loop and robbing the power you need to propel that weight forward. Count an extra second or two after you pause on the backcast to ensure the line straightens completely before making a forward cast. Check out this video by Orvis that will give you some additional ideas on casting heavy nymph and streamer rigs: See All Orvis Learning Center Fly Fishing Video Lessons]]>

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