Video: How to Tie the DPD Nymph

In this week’s video from Tightline Productions, Tim shares a great generalist nymph that’s designed to imitate a wide range of insects and to sink very quickly through the water column. The DPD Nymph is a productive early-season pattern that gets to where the fish are . . . quickly. As usual, the tying process includes a couple cool tricks, including the way that Tim rearranges the hook in the vise to make tying in the tail easier, as well as the way he finishes the fly without tying off the thread. DPD Nymph Hook: Partridge Czech Nymph hook, sizes 14-16. Bead: Black Nickel Cyclops bead, 7/64-inch. Weight: Lead-free round wire, .020. Adhesive #1: Fly Tyers Z-Ment. Thread: Brown, 70-denier or 8/0. Rib: Copper wire, small. Tail: Wood-duck or mallard flank-feather fibers. Abdomen/Wingcase: Rusty brown pheasant tail fibers, trimmed. Thorax: 2 peacock herls. Legs: Wood-duck or mallard flank-feather fibers. Adhesive #2: UV-cure resin. Tools: Plunger-style hackle pliers, sticky note pad....

Pheasant Hunting In Eastern Utah

Pheasant hunting in Utah can be amazing. Our season at Pleasant Valley Hunting Preserve goes from Sept through March. Typically it gets really cold in December and January with a fair amount of snow. This year has been different. The temps have been great for hunting. Morning hunts will be a bit more chilly but spending an afternoon in the field with sunshine can make for a great day. If you've been meaning to book a trip now is the time to do it. Birds are limited because of the good weather. Grab a friend or a group of friends and make your way out and experience a hunt of a lifetime. 435-454-3737...

Video Pro Tips: How to Choose the Right Nymph

One of the first things that a fly fisher learns is that matching the hatch is important. But how, exactly, do you do that–especially when there are no insects on the water’s surface? Here’s a two-part video lesson that demonstrates four methods for sampling the water, which will show you what’s available to trout right now and what food items are generally available. After you’ve determined the most likely bug, the video offers a simple and effective way to choose a nymph that will accurately imitate the insects in your sample. Written By: Phil Monahan ...

Fall Hunting in Utah

Our pheasant season has been excellent this year. The weather has been incredible and the birds are flying hard. We get a lot of people asking us what a typical hunt consists of. Here's what you can expect on a day with us out in the field. Each day hunting starts early with a hearty breakfast at the lodge. On the first day of your hunt you will spend some time on “the bird walk” a seven station clay range designed to simulate shooting scenarios encountered in upland bird hunting, to sharpen and refresh your shooting skills. The rest of that day and all other days are spent hunting on the Hunting Grounds at Pleasant Valley. With an expert guide and world class gun dogs you are sure to get in a lot of great shooting. Hunts at Falcon’s Ledge are conducted in the traditional western walk-up style over pointing or flushing...

Video Pro Tips: A Masterclass in How to Read Water

Here’s a great, full-length episode of “The Orvis Guide to Fly Fishing,” in which Tom Rosenbauer discusses the importance of reading water to find fish in a river. Clear explanations and cool graphics help illusrtate Tom’s detailed discussions of where fish live in rivers and how anglers can present flies to them. The video is 22 minutes long, but it is chock-full of helpful information that will make you a better angler. Written By: Phil Monahan ...

Video: Heads and Tails

Few things can get a fly fisher’s blood pumping like seeing a large trout come to the surface. Check out this cool, mesmerizing video from Norway, featuring big browns eating bugs on top. That trout in an eddy is further proof that “foam is home,” and you should pay attention to such spots when you’re out on the river. Written By: Phil Monahan ...

Video Pro Tip: How to Fish Around Rocks and Logs

Written By: Phil Monahan In this excerpt from the Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center, Tom Rosenbauer explains why fish are found in front of midstream rocks and logs as often as they are found behind such obstacles. So the next time you’re on the water casting to the slick behind a rock or tree, remind yourself to make some casts to the front side, as well. There’s usually a good cushion of deeper water there that makes a fine holding lie. See All Orvis Learning Center Fly Fishing Video Lessons...

Video: Weber River

We have many great trout rivers here in Utah.  The Weber River is one of them that we love to fish. Here is a great short video from Derek Philippon that is filmed on the beautiful Weber River. Enjoy! ...

Fly Fishing 101

[caption id="attachment_52203" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Processed with VSCO with g3 preset[/caption] We recently had a few clients that visited us for their first time fly fishing. They were excited and couldn't wait to get out on the water to catch fish. Before we got out on the water we had to go over a few things so that their experience on the water would be a good experience. Here are a few things to remember when you head out for the first time on the water. Learn from a professional. Go to your local fly shop or guide service and have them teach you the basics. Cast. Learn how to cast. Your time on the water will be much more enjoyable if you can get the fly to the fish. Go to a park and really practice some distance and accuracy. Learn the entomology basics. Learn what bugs are in your water so...

Floating Line or Sinking Tip for Streamers

Here is some great advice from some Orvis guides and experts on when to use floating line or sink tip line when fishing streamers.  I thought there were some great thoughts and ideas here and would help all of us when we are fishing streamers this fall.   Joe Demalderis, Cross Current Guide Service (Milford, Pennsylvania): With streamers, I’m often banging the banks from a drift boat when the water is higher than normal and/or dirtied up. If it’s significantly higher, I’ll use a sinking tip, if not too high, a floating line is fine. Either way, the Bank Shot line is made to order for this. There are also occasions when the water isn’t that high, but for softness of presentation I want a unweighted fly. Under those conditions, a sinking tip with fluorocarbon leader is the ticket. When swinging wet flies, I prefer to use one bigger/heavier fly and a dropper that is smaller...