Video Pro Tip: Use Your Hemostat to Tie a Clinch Knot

Tying the clinch knot at your kitchen table is ridiculously easy, and it’s one of the first knots that most anglers use. But what about when your hands are really cold or the light is too low for you to thread the tag end through the loop? Here’s a fast, simple way to tie the knot using a standard hemostat. (The narrator of the video above says “hemostats,” instead of the correct “hemostat,” but I’ll look the other way because of the useful info.)The video , from In the Riffle, is fairly low quality, but you’ll be astonished by how easy the technique demonstrated is.Written By: Phil MonahanCheck out more great blogs and fly fishing advice at www.news.orvis.com.  ...

Ask the Experts: How Do You Set Your Drag Before Fishing?

A few months ago, we introduced a new weekly “Ask the Experts” Column and asked you to pose some questions for our panel of experts. Our latest question for them to chew on is: “How Do You Set Your Drag Before Fishing?”Photo by Chad Shmukler, Hatch MagazinePatrick Fulkrod, The South Holston River Company (Bristol, Virginia): A super loaded question considering circumstances and variables. On an initial evaluation of my drag setting, I will always fish with it set a little on the lighter side: loose enough, but not so it will backlash. If or when I hook a good fish, I will tighten as needed. I feel it is always easier (or more forgiving) in a situation to add more drag, rather than to lessen the drag. Tim Linehan, Linehan Outfitting Co. (Troy, Montana): The analogy I’ve always used when discussing how to set the drag on your reel is that it’s based...

Video: How Does a Trout Catch a Fly? Marinaro’s “Edge of the Window Theory”

Poking around on vimeo, I stumbled on this fascinating video by English fly-fishing guide Paul Kenyon, explaining the theories of Vince Marinaro and others about how fish perceive our flies in the water. Starting from the concept of the relationship between fish’s “window” of sight and the “mirror” on the water’s surface, Kenyon arrives and some insights into how to design effective trout flies and why our artificial flies are sometimes ignored by feeding trout.Written By: Phil Monahan...

Fish Facts: Colorado River Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhyncus clarkii pleuriticus)

This Colorado River cutthroat, from southern Utah, displays dark, rich colors. Photo by Mike Hadley Considered one of the more beautiful trout in North America, the Colorado River cutthroat trout (Oncorhyncus clarkii pleuriticus) once inhabited the high-elevation streams and lakes of the Green and Colorado River basins in parts of five states. As was the case with many cutthroat subspecies, however, the arrival of European settlers in the West led to massive declines in CRCT populations. Where the fish are still found, anglers prize CRCT for their willingness to eat flies, the beauty of their high-country habitat, and their spectacular colors. The cutthroat-slam programs of both Wyoming and Utah require anglers to land a Colorado River cutthroat to complete the collection of native fish species. Range and Species History The Colorado River cutthroat is considered by most experts to have evolved from the Yellowstone cutthroat based on geographical isolation. The original range of the...

Pro Tips: What Does “Anodized” Mean for a Fly Reel?

Whenever you see advertising copy for a fly reel, it usually mentions that the metal is anodized. (For instance, the description might say that the reel is made from “anodized 6061 T6 aluminum.”) The copy might even note that there’s a special type of anodizing involved. If you’re not really sure what these terms mean, here’s a brief primer. Anodizing is a chemical process that creates a coating on the surface of a metal (usually aluminum), which makes the metal more durable and resistant to scratches and dings. Anodizing also increases corrosion resistance and makes the metal easier to dye. Reel manufacturers use aluminum because it is so light, but it’s also quite soft. Without anodizing, an aluminum reel would not be very durable.The most common method of anodizing involves dipping the aluminum in sulfuric acid and then running electrical current through the acid. This causes aluminum oxide to form on...

Summer Fishing in the Uintas

Summer fishing in the Uintas can be amazing. The snowpack can dictate when the rivers will be stable and fishable. When we have a great snow year the rivers usually are fishable around the first week of July. Most of our rivers are at high elevation so we have to wait a few weeks while the snow melts and the rivers aren't at dangerous levels. During this time we like to fish lakes. Fishing lakes hold some of the biggest fish and can be challenging trying to imitate the bugs that are present at the time. Some bugs that hatch on lakes in the spring are: Midges, Callibaetis, scuds and the occasional cicada.When the rivers settle down from runoff we have several small streams and rivers that we fish. We fish Rock Creek, Yellowstone river, Lake Fork, Uinta and Whiterocks. These small streams hold good numbers of rainbows, browns, brook...

Photo of the Day: Perfect Timing

Utahn Doug Roberts–who runs Old Moe Guide Service, based in the town of Dutch John, sent in this killer photo of a big brown getting ready to send a blue-winged olive down the hatch. Huge emergences of these olives occur during April and May on the Green River, bringing big trout to the surface to gorge after the long winter. Looks like a great place to kick off the spring!The Green River is a world-famous trout fishery and a beautiful canyon. It fishes well just about any time of year. We are happy to set you up with a day floating the Green River with our friends at Old Moe Guide Service.  It makes a great day of fishing as part of your trip to Falcon's Ledge Lodge to see the spectacular trout rivers Utah has to offer. Another day of your trip we can take you to fish the...

Video: Fishing the Green River in Utah

Here is a nicely done video about the beautiful Green River here in Utah. The Green River is one of the most beautiful and well-known tailwater trout fisheries in the United States. Many fishermen from all over the world come to Utah to fish the Green River. It is a spectacular fishery with nearly 10,000 fish per mile. The scenery is breathtaking and the guides are fantastic. We have many guests that stay at Falcon's Ledge that want to fish the Green. We set them up with a guide for the day and they drive out in the morning, enjoy a beautiful day of fishing, and return to the lodge in the evening to a nice dinner. It is a great way to spend a day in Utah.  Many of these fishermen stay to fish the other spectacular rivers and streams in northern Utah. We have five streams just above...

Pro Tip: The ONE Thing You Can Do to Become a Better Fly Fisherman

A year has ended and a new one begins. Like most people, I look back and reflect on what the previous year has taught me or what insights I might have gleaned from all my time guiding. I am always wondering how to do it better or give my clients a more rewarding experience. Recently, the tables were turned on me a bit. One of my longtime clients asked what they could do to make the coming season more productive and enjoyable. We’ve all read the articles and stories on how to improve your fishing, and perhaps they all seem to really be saying the same things rehashed in a different way. I was looking at some past publications and thinking about the question posed to me. One thing jumped out at me. The answer wasn’t learn to mend, fly selection, knots, or even equipment that could improve your fishing this...

Video: Getting Started in Fly Fishing, Parts I-III

If you or someone you know is taking up fly fishing for the first time–or returning after a long absence–check out this great new video series from Brian Flechsig of Mad River Outiffters in Columbus, Ohio. In the first three episodes, Flechsig describes the six things you need to start fly fishing, how to understand fly-rod sizes (weights), and how to choose the right rod for the kind of fishing you want to do.Yes, this is very basic stuff, but it’s vital information for folks who are new to the sport. The biggest barrier to entry for anyone taking up a new activity is lack of information. Stay tuned to learn more!...