Fall Fishing Coming Soon

It's August and in just a couple of short months we'll be trading in the short sleeve shirts for hoodies and light jackets. Fall can be some of the best fishing all year. The weather is cooling off and bugs will continue to hatch. Here are some tips on how you can make your fall fishing the best it can be. 1- Streamers. Start tying your favorite streamers. Browns will be aggressive this time of year pre-spawn. Some streamers we really like for fall are: Matukas, Orange Blossom Special, Muddler Minnow, Clouser Minnow, Sex Dungeon and other various meat. 2- Dress appropriately. After fishing all summer it can be hard to pack something warm when out fishing in cooler weather. Once the sun goes down in the fall the temps can drop. Make sure you have something warm to make your fishing more comfortable. 3- During the spawn be careful of where you wade in...

New Water

When you've been guiding the same waters for 20 plus years it's hard to find areas that haven't been explored before. Falcon's Ledge guide, Bryan Eldredge had been studying google earth in search for new water for weeks. He saw a stretch of rive that we never thought about fishing and had an idea that we should go look into it. We headed out to this river talking about what we could expect from this stretch of new water. Based on previous experiences fishing much higher upstream that we could catch brook trout, rainbows, browns and cutts. When we finally arrived we saw a great run and immediately Bryan hooked into a rainbow. Our next six or seven fish were rainbows. This was unusual for this to happen. We mainly catch brown on this river but it was great to see so many bows. The higher up we got on the river...

Taking Turns

There are rivers that we fish where the fish are skittish and spook easily. Along with that some of these rivers don't have many fish per mile which compounds the problem. This can be very frustrating when you can see the fish but can't really get a cast to them without sending them up river or to the other side of the lake. When guiding we mostly take two anglers at a time. When we fish these types of rivers we have to explain to the clients what we're up against. What do we do in these situations? First we explain to the clients that there are not many fish in this river system so the best way to fish it is by taking turns. We have one client up to fish first. We try to put them on fish the best we can. If they get a good shot at...

How Do You Attach the Second Fly in a Tandem Rig?

Last year, we introduced a new weekly “Ask the Experts” Column and asked you to pose some questions for our panel of experts. Our latest question for them to chew on is: “How do you attach the second fly in a tandem rig: to the hook bend of the top fly, to the hook eye of the top fly, or to the tag end of a knot in the leader?” Their answers are below. If you’ve got a question you’d like to ask our panel, write it in the comments section below. Alvin Dedeaux, All Water Guides (Austin, Texas): I use a regular old clinch knot tied to the bend of the first hook. Fast and easy, and when I want to change droppers or change the length of the tippet, it only takes a couple of minutes. Joe Demalderis, Cross Current Guide Service (Milford, Pennsylvania): Most often, I tie the second fly to the...

Video Pro Tip: Dry Your Flies with a Rubber Band

Few things are more frustrating than a dry fly that won’t float–especially when you know that it’s the right pattern that the trout will eat. Here’s a great tip from Hawkins Outfitters Head Guide Jon Ray, who shows you how to use a rubber band to make your dry flies float longer. What could be simpler? Written By: Phil Monahan ...

Monday Tip

Holidays are alway interesting when it comes to fishing and getting to your favorite areas. We always try to avoid crowds and for the most part we can do that. However, certain holidays are tricky and will make you think of doing things a little differently. As the 4th of July soon approaches here are some tips on avoiding crowds. 1- Hike. It's pretty clear that most people that get out on the holidays are there for a short time so they want to get as much fishing in as possible. When this happens we arrive at the place we want to fish and hike upstream. It's usually not a huge hike but most people will just fish the most obvious and convenient areas. A little hike will go a long ways. 2- If you don't want to hike or don't have the time then focus on areas that you normally don't...

Video: How to Get Your Nymphs Into the Strike Zone

Orvis product developer Jesse Haller, the guy in charge of flies and accessories, is a pretty active competition fly fisherman, and he’s big proponent of tightline nymphing. The technique, developed by European competitive anglers, is so effective because it gets the nymphs quickly into the trout’s strike zone and keeps them there. In his new how-to video, Jesse describes the three factors that affect how fast your flies sink–fly weight, tippet diameter, and how the flies enter the water–and shows you exactly how to set up and cast to maximize the time your flies spend in the strike zone. Written By: Phil Monahan ...

Beaver Ponds

We often stumble upon beaver dams when fishing our streams in the Uintas. This can provide some great fishing if you know what to look for and how to fish it effectively. Most beaver dams will create a stillwater situation so most of the time it's a good idea to treat it like a lake especially if the fish are skittish. Here are some tips to keep in mind when fishing beaver dams. 1- Be sneaky. Keep a low profile and be walk slow. Fish in beaver dams are used to predators and will be on the look out for anything out of the ordinary. Hawks, eagles and osprey are alway looking for an easy meal and beaver ponds provide that. 2- Use longer leaders. We like to use 10-12ft leaders so the splash of the fly line doesn't spook the fish. 3- Don't be lazy. Before you get to a beaver dam...

Classic Pro Tips: 3 Steps to Teaching Teens to Fly Fish

Teens are among the hardest groups to engage in a new activity. Photos by Will Lillard Before I led Lillard Fly Fishing Expedition’s first teen fly fishing adventure, I sat down for a beer with TU’s Director of Youth Education, Franklin Tate. We talked about the success TU has had engaging young kids with their Stream Explorers program, and the growing number of college students participating in TU college chapters. Then we talked about the challenges of engaging teens. Despite their efforts, TU has not experienced the same success with teenagers that they have enjoyed with pre-teens and college students. In the last few years, I have worked almost entirely with teens. During that time I have come to the conclusion that there is no shortage of teens who are willing to give fly fishing a try; the key is presenting and teaching fly fishing in a way that caters to them....

Video: Finding Clear-Water Trout in Murky Conditions

Dave and Amelia Jensen, of Jensen Fly Fishing in Alberta, have produced another episode in their “The Bank” series of instructional videos. Here’s Dave’s description: After 5 hours of walking up an increasingly murky side channel to a larger river that was being impacted by heavy rains in the high country, we finally came to the mouth of a spring creek tributary unaffected by rains. And cue the rising brown trout spotted in the sliver of gin-clear water. We watched a spell as the fish cycled round the clear water pocket, making moves that respected the brown’s movement, its visibility, and the sensitivity to its small, quiet habitat. Note the time we take in filming this sequence, how subtle the movements are, how deliberate each move is made, when the casts are made. The first cast was taken and the hook set was ok, but note how the head turns quickly...