10 Tips That Will Make You a Better Fly Fisher

 Here are 10 great tips from our friends at Orvis on how to become a better fly fisher.One of the great things about fly fishing is that you never stop learning. No matter how long you’ve been at it, there is always another technique, style, or fishery to explore. Every day, we offer tips and tactics that will help make you a better angler. Here are 10 such useful tips to help you make the most of your time on the water. 1. How to Make a Delicate Presentation The secret to a delicate presentation is in controlling the rod tip. If you drop the rod tip too early on the presentation cast, the fly line doesn’t roll out completely and instead “crashes” to the surface. Instead, the rod tip should stop at or around eye level to let the loop roll out. Only then should you lower the rod tip. Tell...

Video Tip: How to Tie On a Dropper

Tying on a dropper when you’re on the water can be a real pain for some anglers, as Steve Moore says of this video: “Tiny tippet, big fingers and small hooks all conspire to make this aspect of fly fishing difficult.” We’ve offered a couple simple methods for creating the standard hook-bend dropper knot–see here–but Steve shows another great way that makes use of your hemostat. I have found that, no matter the knot, there’s no method for tying it that works for everyone, so I always enjoy discovering new methods that will help more anglers be able to get the job done.Written By: Phil Monahanhttps://youtu.be/5e2wei5_mTw...

Video Tip: How to Tie the Classic Renegade

The Renegade is one of those classic attractor patterns that doesn’t necessarily look like anything in nature but has consistently caught fish for decades. With fore and aft hackles like its relative, the Bivisible, the Renegade floats well in rough water and looks buggy enough to bring fish to the surface. Plus, the contrasting hackles make the fly easy to see in all kinds of light. In his latest how-to video, Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions walks you through the process of tying a Renegade, explaining how to choose the right hackles, orient the peacock herl, and make a clean thread head.https://youtu.be/RyUUqi3HnfkRenegade Hook: Standard dry-fly hook (here, a Dai-Riki #300), sizes 12-18. Thread: Cream, 8/0 or 70-denier. Tag: Gold/silver Mylar Tinsel, extra-small. Rear hackle: Brown. Body: Peacock herl. Front hackle: Cream or white. Head: Tying thread....

Tip: How to Mend Line

Here is some great advice on mending line from our good friend Tim Linehan. Enjoy!I remember the day the light bulb went off for me. I was standing shin deep in a small New Hampshire stream under the colorful fall foliage canopy while several brook trout rose in front of me. I was a rookie angler but had finally managed to learn how to cast without embarrassing myself. It wasn’t pretty, but it was beginning to work. However, I knew little about the importance of drag-free drifts and the extent to which they contributed to the success of catching trout. I was vaguely aware of the term “mending,” but the concept hadn’t really taken hold. I’d make a cast, drop the fly right in front of a fish, and immediately the current would grab my Elk-Hair Caddis and swish it downstream so fast it was impossible for anything to grab it. Then...

Tip: How To Tie A Killer Ant Pattern

Ants are among the most important summertime fly patterns for both trout and panfish. When the sun is high and nothing is rising, oftentimes a Black or Cinnamon Ant can save the day. One of the great things about this fly is that you can fish it in all kinds of water–from flat eddies to riffles to bankside runs. Plus, it often works even when it has been sunk by the current or rough water. But my favorite place to fish an ant is in the mountain freestone streams near my house, where wild brookies are almost always looking up for a tasty morsel floating by. There are tons of ants on the banks and in the bushes along these streams, which means that the fish are accustomed to seeing (and eating) these nutritious insects. I’ll often fish a black ant as a dropper behind a grasshopper or attractor dry fly. The splat! of the...

Video Tip: How to Retrieve Streamers, Wet Flies, and Nymphs to Catch Trout

When rivers are blown out from runoff or rain, lakes and ponds offer some of your best chances to catch trout. Many anglers think that stillwater fishing involves little more than chucking a fly out as far as you can and then stripping it back, but there’s a lot more to it than that. The way you retrieve a fly can be the key to catching fish.Here’s an educational video that teaches you three different retrieves to use with streamers, wets, and nymphs. There are also several more tips at the end to help you decide which stripping technique to use in a given situation.Written By: Phil Monahanhttps://youtu.be/w9bwP2amPKU...

How to Attach the Second Fly in a Tandem Rig

Tying the dropper to the hook bend of the top fly is the most common method for creating a tandem rig. Photo by Phil Monahan A few months ago, we introduced a new weekly “Ask the Experts” Column and asked you to pose some questions for our panel of experts. Our latest question for them to chew on is: “How do you attach the second fly in a tandem rig: to the hook bend of the top fly, to the hook eye of the top fly, or to the tag end of a knot in the leader?”Their answers are below. If you’ve got a question you’d like to ask our panel, write it in the comments section below.Alvin Dedeaux, All Water Guides (Austin, Texas): I use a regular old clinch knot tied to the bend of the first hook. Fast and easy, and when I want to change droppers or change the length of the tippet,...

Video: Salmon Fly

This beautifully done video featuring the salmon fly hatch captures the beauty and peace of fly fishing. It also gets me excited for the summer hatches that are just around the corner....

Tip: The Simplest Blood-Knot Method You’ve Ever Seen

Our pal Louis Cahill at Gink + Gasoline posted an awesome video featuring professional leader-maker Christopher Fave tying a blood-knot. Even if you consider yourself pretty good at tying blood knots, you will be blown away by Fave’s technique, which is easier and faster than anything we’ve ever seen before. This video may even convert some double-surgeon’s-knot proponents!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-QGPzEKZKo&feature=youtu.be...

Tip: How to Be Stealthy When Dry Fly Fishing

Oliver Edwards is a big-name fly fisherman in England, and his fly patterns are popular worldwide. In this video, he talks about what it takes to be stealthy when you are on a stream with very clear water, which often makes trout spooky. Most anglers know that they have to be stealthy when wading, but Edwards shows you how to pick your line up off the water without making a splash or creating a sucking sound that could scare the trout. This will allow you to get more drifts and more shots at fish in these situations....