Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Get Out On The Water

Nearly everything I have learned about fly fishing and trout I have learned by being out on the water exploring and learning on the water.  Sometimes I have gone by myself and watched and learned, other times I have gone with family and friends and learned from them.Experience on the water is invaluable and there is no substitute for getting out and exploring, watching, and experiencing fly fishing on the water.  The best way to learn the basics of putting a rod outfit together, casting, tying knots, and mending line is to do it over and over again out on the river.  The only way to learn new casts for different situations and to drift a fly in different currents is to constantly fish new and different situations.  Learning to identify aquatic insects and match flies to those insects is best done by walking the river or lakeside and watching...

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Be Observant

Whether you are a novice or an expert fly fisherman being observant is critical to catching fish.  Each time you go fishing it is very important to watch what it is going on both in and around the water.  Everything in the water and the environment around the water can influence where the fish are in the water column, what they are feeding on, and how to catch them.When I was first learning to fly fish I would often go down to the Provo River and watch the river and the fish for hours.  Many cloudy, cool days I would watch trout sip midges off the surface.  On warm days in late June and early July I would watch trout move into the shallows near the edge of the river and eat stoneflies that would fall off the bushes into the water.  As I observed the different times of the...

Uintah Canyon Fishing

There are 5 beautiful canyons above Falcon's Ledge Lodge where we often fish and explore.  We hear comments from guests that they are the most gorgeous canyons they have ever seen.  The canyons are in the Ashley National Forest on the south slope of the Uintah Mountains, the highest mountain range in Utah.  All of these canyons have beautiful rivers that run down them and these rivers are home to a wide variety of trout species, making the fishing options nearly endless right in the backyard of Falcon's Ledge.In the higher reaches of the canyons the canyon drops quickly and the canyon walls are steep making the water fast and cold.  The fish are small in these upper stretches, but they make up in beauty what they lack in size.  These upper section of the canyons provide beautiful forest scenery, great small stream fishing, and beautiful wild fish.This cold, fast...

Southern Hospitality

 Maybe it's just me, but most of the people I've met who fish, especially fly fish, are the salt of the earth. These are the people who genuinely care about nature, wildlife, the environment, and each other. Fishing to them is more than a hobby, it's an activity that strengthens mind, body, and spirit. It creates and solidifies relationships, especially families. And if you meet people like this from the South, especially Georgia, you are in for a real treat.Such was the case for me last week with a family from Georgia. Mom and Dad were treating their college-graduating son with a trip out west. And of course the fiancé and younger sister came too. Fly fishing was on the agenda, and there's no better place to learn than Falcon's Ledge fly fishing lodge in Eastern Utah. Fellow guides Bryan Eldredge and Spencer Higa helped guide this group and day...

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Reading a River

Many times when a fisherman first takes up fly fishing they walk up to a river and do not know where to start.  This is especially true on large rivers that will often intimidate or overwhelm a novice fisherman.  Here are a few helpful tips and hints of places to start looking for fish in a river.1- Fish often hold up behind rocks and submerged wood. Behind rocks and wood in the river provide a break in the current which provides a place for trout to sit without expending much energy.  Insects cling to rocks and wood, so these places also provide a great food source for fish.  These spots also often provide hiding places underneath the log or under a rock shelf.  These little pockets behind rocks or submerged wood are ideal places for trout and are often some of the most productive spots to fish.  Casting a dry fly...

20 Years of Fishing and Adventure

For nearly 20 years a group of doctors from the University of Utah has come to Falcon’s Ledge to enjoy the beauty, solitude, and phenomenal fishing found in eastern Utah.  Woody Spruance and his friends, who study infectious disease at the University of Utah, take a break every May and spend three days fishing, eating, relaxing, and enjoying the beauty of the natural surroundings at Falcon’s Ledge.In 1995 Woody discovered Falcon’s Ledge and realized that the beautiful 15,000 square foot lodge set in a private 600 acre canyon with 8 trophy trout lakes was the perfect place to bring his fellow doctors for some relaxation and phenomenal fishing.  The lodge has 8 well-appointed rooms with private bathrooms, a large dining room, corporate meeting room, television room, a fully-furnished fly fishing shop, and recreation room in the basement.  The lodge is the perfect set up for a corporate group, executive retreat,...

Learning by Observing

Quite a few years ago I began guiding at Falcon's Ledge with the idea that all my trips would be on the rivers. I soon found out that not all of my clients would be mobile enough to trek through stream beds and fast moving water. The alternative would be to fish the 8 small still waters on the property. The stillwaters are small and medium in size and are easily fishable from the shoreline.I learned a lot about the stillwaters more each time I guided. One of the most important things I learned was to observe what was going on around the water and in the water. One spring afternoon I was guiding a gentlemen from Mesa, Arizona. We made it down to one of my favorite stillwater to try and catch the Callibaetis hatch. The hatch had been pretty consistent so I knew that we could go down...

Beginner Fun

One of the best things about being a guide is teaching beginners. I would say probably half of our guests at Falcon's Ledge are beginners. Each person new to fly fishing presents unique challenges and areas in need of development. As a guide, the job is to assess the situation, determine the solution and present that solution in a creative way that the student will understand. And that is both challenging and rewarding.When I decided to get serious about fly fishing back in my early 20s, I chose the hard way. I first started looking for magazine articles on fly fishing. I recall one of the first articles I read was about mending the line. I had no idea what mending was. So I turned the handle around on my Eagle Claw pack rod, making it a fly rod, attached my dad's old fly reel, and headed for the river....

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Shooting Line

When casting it is important to release line at the proper moment so that it shoots well and you get good distance on your cast.  To release line at the right moment you can use sight or feel as an indicator of when to release the grip on the line with your non-casting hand.If you are using the sight technique watch for the loop in your fly line to appear in front of you.  When you see the loop appear release the grip on the line with your non-casting hand and feather it out keeping your rod pointed straight out in front of you to keep line shooting out.When using the feel technique you will be sensing the stop of the rod on the forward cast.  Once you feel the rod stop on the forward throw you will follow the same procedure.  Let go of the line in your non-casting...