Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Reading a River

Many times when a fisherman first takes up fly fishing they walk up to a river and do not know where to start.  This is especially true on large rivers that will often intimidate or overwhelm a novice fisherman.  Here are a few helpful tips and hints of places to start looking for fish in a river.1- Fish often hold up behind rocks and submerged wood. Behind rocks and wood in the river provide a break in the current which provides a place for trout to sit without expending much energy.  Insects cling to rocks and wood, so these places also provide a great food source for fish.  These spots also often provide hiding places underneath the log or under a rock shelf.  These little pockets behind rocks or submerged wood are ideal places for trout and are often some of the most productive spots to fish.  Casting a dry fly...

20 Years of Fishing and Adventure

For nearly 20 years a group of doctors from the University of Utah has come to Falcon’s Ledge to enjoy the beauty, solitude, and phenomenal fishing found in eastern Utah.  Woody Spruance and his friends, who study infectious disease at the University of Utah, take a break every May and spend three days fishing, eating, relaxing, and enjoying the beauty of the natural surroundings at Falcon’s Ledge.In 1995 Woody discovered Falcon’s Ledge and realized that the beautiful 15,000 square foot lodge set in a private 600 acre canyon with 8 trophy trout lakes was the perfect place to bring his fellow doctors for some relaxation and phenomenal fishing.  The lodge has 8 well-appointed rooms with private bathrooms, a large dining room, corporate meeting room, television room, a fully-furnished fly fishing shop, and recreation room in the basement.  The lodge is the perfect set up for a corporate group, executive retreat,...

Learning by Observing

Quite a few years ago I began guiding at Falcon's Ledge with the idea that all my trips would be on the rivers. I soon found out that not all of my clients would be mobile enough to trek through stream beds and fast moving water. The alternative would be to fish the 8 small still waters on the property. The stillwaters are small and medium in size and are easily fishable from the shoreline.I learned a lot about the stillwaters more each time I guided. One of the most important things I learned was to observe what was going on around the water and in the water. One spring afternoon I was guiding a gentlemen from Mesa, Arizona. We made it down to one of my favorite stillwater to try and catch the Callibaetis hatch. The hatch had been pretty consistent so I knew that we could go down...

Beginner Fun

One of the best things about being a guide is teaching beginners. I would say probably half of our guests at Falcon's Ledge are beginners. Each person new to fly fishing presents unique challenges and areas in need of development. As a guide, the job is to assess the situation, determine the solution and present that solution in a creative way that the student will understand. And that is both challenging and rewarding.When I decided to get serious about fly fishing back in my early 20s, I chose the hard way. I first started looking for magazine articles on fly fishing. I recall one of the first articles I read was about mending the line. I had no idea what mending was. So I turned the handle around on my Eagle Claw pack rod, making it a fly rod, attached my dad's old fly reel, and headed for the river....

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Shooting Line

When casting it is important to release line at the proper moment so that it shoots well and you get good distance on your cast.  To release line at the right moment you can use sight or feel as an indicator of when to release the grip on the line with your non-casting hand.If you are using the sight technique watch for the loop in your fly line to appear in front of you.  When you see the loop appear release the grip on the line with your non-casting hand and feather it out keeping your rod pointed straight out in front of you to keep line shooting out.When using the feel technique you will be sensing the stop of the rod on the forward cast.  Once you feel the rod stop on the forward throw you will follow the same procedure.  Let go of the line in your non-casting...

Beautiful Trout

Trout are beautiful animals that live in beautiful rivers.  They have amazing patterns and vibrant colors and when you catch one and pull it out of a crystal clear river running through spectacular scenery it is tough to beat the beauty and majesty of the species and the moment.These moments are our favorites at Falcon's Ledge and we love to see these beautiful fish each and everyday we get the chance to catch them with our friends we fish with.  Here are a few of our favorite beauties that we have had the pleasure of admiring so far this year.     ...

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Entomology

One of the first steps to catch fish fly-fishing is to identify what they are eating so you can imitate it.  Trout in rivers eat a variety of food, but three general classifications of aquatic insects that trout generally eat are Caddisflies, Mayflies, and Stoneflies.  Being able to identify these three common aquatic-born insects will help you know what the fish are eating and know how to imitate it.1- Caddisflies - Most caddisfly larvae are underwater architects and use silk, excreted from salivary glands near their mouths, for building protective cases.  Adult caddisflies are small moth-like insects having two pairs of hairy membranous wing.  They live in a variety of aquatic habitats such as: rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, and canals.  Caddisfly LarvaeCaddisfly Adult2- Mayflies - Mayflies are aquatic insects whose larval stage usually lasts one year in fresh water. The adults are short-lived, from a few minutes to a few days, depending on the species.  The larval stage lives...

Saturday Morning Brown Trout

On a Saturday morning about two weeks ago with my two boys in tow I ran a few errands and checked on a few guests we had fishing with us.  As we drove past the trout lakes my boys asked if they could throw rocks in the lake.  I pulled up to one of the lakes that didn't have anyone on it and let the boys out to throw a few rocks.  I strung up my Helios 2 and watched the water for a few minutes.  As I scanned the water I saw some fish taking emerging midges along the south shoreline of the lake.  I put on a midge pattern and walked down the shoreline a little ways looking for a fish working the weed line.  After just a few minutes I saw one cruising the edge of the weeds and I cast just in front of him.  He sipped...

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Playing Fish

When you hook a fish and the fight is on it is easy to get caught up in the excitement of the moment and not think clearly, but if you keep calm and remember a few simple techniques you will be able to get most fish into your net.  Here a few things to keep in mind when fighting a fish that will help you play a fish properly.1- Keep tension on the fish - Keeping constant pressure on the fish will help keep the hook set in the fishes mouth and not allow the hook to come free.  This is a balance between keeping constant tension and not putting too much pressure and breaking the line.  Setting the drag on your reel properly and getting the fish on the reel as quickly as possible will help balance the pressure on the line.2- Fight the fish from downstream - Fighting...