Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Streamers

This week’s fly fishing quick tip is on streamer fishing.  Streamers can be a great way to catch big, predatory fish, and a great option when nothing is hatching.  Streamer patterns work especially well after a storm when the water is turbid and predatory trout are targeting baitfish.  Large brown, brook, and cutthroat trout become very predatory when they get over 16 inches in size and streamers are a great way to imitate their main prey.Common streamer patterns include: woolly buggers, muddlers, sculpins, shiners, crayfish, and leeches.  Check out Orvis’ streamer patterns to get some great ideas for streamer patterns to use: http://www.orvis.com/store/product_search_tnail.aspx?dir_id=1236&group_id=1260.The best streamer pattern to use varies widely depending on geographic area, elevation, and water body.  For example, crayfish mainly live in lakes, but sculpins live in rivers.  In order to determine the best streamer pattern to use in the water body you are fishing, hire a guide...

A Day Off With Stillwater Rainbows

A Day Off With Stillwater Rainbows There are times, though few, during the fly fishing guiding season when guides get a chance to fish together.  This usually occurs when client schedules line up just right so that two or three guides have a day off in between trips.  Such was the case last September when guides Spencer Higa and Derek Olthuis accompanied me to a favorite reservoir in Eastern Utah.  After a packed summer of guiding, we were eager to get away and do some casting of our own.   As most of our trips take place on beautiful small streams, I was looking forward to some spacious water and a chance to stretch out my cast as far as I could.  The drive seemed to take forever, but the day was perfect with blue sky and little wind. Upon arrival, we found the reservoir level was lower than usual, due to a...

The Phlamin Pheasant

Tim Jenkins has been very busy over the last few years. Between school and raising a family he has found time to sit down at the vise and create effective fly patterns. Once such pattern is the Phlamin Pheasant.  Here's a little write up about how he came up with the pattern. Also, Congratulations to Tim for completing his Phd in 2013. I originally designed this fly specifically for the Provo river. I wanted something that looked like a lot of different food items and that had some serious flash (as a fly tyer I have a flash addiction). In my experience a rusty orange color has worked extremely well on the Provo and a number of other rivers, so I set out to make a fly with a similar body style to that of a pheasant tail, except on a curved hook – I believe it makes the fly look...

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Dry Dropper Rig

The week’s fly fishing quick tip is on fishing a dry dropper rig.  At Falcon’s Ledge we fish dry dropper rigs quite often.  The dry dropper rig is a great option when you have occasionally rising fish, but suspect or can see that there are more fish in the stretch you are fishing that aren’t rising.  It is also a great set up for simply prospecting for fish when you are fishing a stretch of river you are unfamiliar with or don’t see any rising fish.To set up a dry dropper rig simply tie on a high-floating dry fly to your tippet using a clinch knot.  Use a dry fly that is large and high-floating so you can see it well.  Also, be sure that the dry fly is one that you know or suspect represents well the water-born insects that live on the river you are fishing.  Next, tie...

Winter Fly Fishing Fun

Guides Jeff Lindstrom and Bryan Eldredge have a great day fly fishing on this beautiful winter day.  Jeff and Bryan show that fly fishing can be enjoyed at any time of the year, and not just during the warm summer months.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYBQNCJkwXk...

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Mending Line

This week’s fly fishing quick tip is on mending line. In a river or stream there are many different currents with differing speeds and directions. Ideally when fishing an angler should cast upstream and let the current bring their fly back to them this allows the line and fly to be in the same current and move at the same speed preventing drag on the fly. However, this is often not possible and an angler in many circumstances must cast across the river to get his fly to a fish. This will often cause the fly line to lay on a different current then the fly. The line will either be moving downstream faster or slower than the fly and cause the fly to drag across the water making it look unnatural to the fish.Mending can prevent your fly from dragging across the water and help you catch more fish....

Why We Trust the Helios 2

Here in Eastern Utah we have a longstanding association with the picturesque small, mountain streams that hold endless opportunities, particularly for the dry-fly fanatic in catching abundant brown trout, rainbows, cutthroat and brooke trout.[caption id="attachment_2502" align="aligncenter" width="502"] Alex played this bruiser like a champ on his 10' 5 weight H2 during his trip to Falcon's Ledge[/caption]But as many guests have been fortunate enough to experience, these fishing opportunities are not limited to the light tackle quarry, with the opportunity to catch large, powerful fish (both in still water and stream scenarios) that will put a serious bend in your rod.  These are the fish that test both your gear, as well as your ability to play them to the net, and when I'm on the water with clients I prefer to leave as little room for error as possible. [caption id="attachment_3074" align="aligncenter" width="498"] A healthy still water rainbow fills the net,...

Guide Flies

Innovative trout flies by Falcon's Ledge Guides and Orvis Guides everywhere know their stuff when it comes to choosing and tying the right guide flies for their home waters. But it's not every guide fly that gets chosen to appear in the Orvis fly fishing catalog. Here at Falcon's Ledge we are extremely lucky to have some of the best guides and fly tying pros anywhere, and confirmation of this fact is the confidence Orvis and anglers everywhere have in these incredible flies.CDC Loopwing Quill Emerger Just one of many entries from our resident fly-tying guru, Grant Bench, The CDC Loopwing Quill Emerger is an incredible hatch matcher for picky fish. The Loop-wing Emerger is offered in 3 colors to match blue winged olives, sulphers and PMDs, and Hendricksons. These can also be adapted to work for nearly any hatching mayfly. We use this guide fly for picky fish in the early...

Fishing at an Early Age

As a kid growing up in Provo, Utah, fishing was an important part of my life. My father taught me to fish at a very young age on the shores of lakes in central and southern Utah. In those days, the fishing season started on the saturday morning of Memorial Day weekend. So every year my family would pack the camp trailer and head for beautiful Panquitch Lake. On opening morning, we were the first ones on the lake, arriving even before it was light enough to see. I would often stay wrapped in a blanket in the station wagon waiting for the temps to warm up while my parents and older siblings were out fishing. When I couldn't  wait any longer, I would bundle up and hurry down to the waters edge, pole in hand, to find my father running up and down the untangling lines and netting fish....

Utah Ice-fishing

My first love will always be fly fishing, but once the lakes freeze over in December the only way to get to the big trout found in Utah lakes is through the ice.  In the winter months I spend a good amount of time with an ice rod and ice jigs catching these beautiful trout through the ice and enjoying the peace and quiet of the snow-covered landscape and a lake to myself.  It is a great way to see some beautiful country and catch a lot of nice fish.On a beautiful evening this month I drilled a few holes in a local lake hoping to get a bend in my rod.  Within minutes I saw my rod tip twitch and reeled up a nice 18-inch rainbow trout.  I dropped my line back down to the bottom and after a few more minutes the rod tip began to dip again. ...