Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Approaching Fish

Fly Fishing Tip - Approach with Caution Approaching fish properly is a critical part of fly fishing that we often don't think about.  It is important because if a fish gets spooked it will not feed for some time and a fisherman will probably lose the opportunity to catch that fish.1- Approach from Downstream. The first thing to keep in mind when approaching fish is to approach them from downstream.  A fishes anatomy is designed to face upstream for feeding, breathing, and to hold their position in a stream.  Because fish face upstream they cannot see well downstream and if you approach fish from downstream they will be much less likely to see you and spook.2- Use Stealth. Try to approach each fish with as much stealth as possible.  When you are fishing a small stream or water is low and clear, fish can spook even if you are approaching from...

Lucky No. 13

The Tireless Pursuit of an Elusive Trout Grand Slam Seven anglers from New York met at Falcon’s Ledge for a three day fly fishing trip. They were brought together by Adam Cook, the fishing manager of the Buffalo, NY Orvis store. It was my privilege to guide Adam the year prior during his visit to the lodge, and he wanted to come back for more. This year, I was fortunate to guide Bill and Mike, two clients of his that were retired educators...

Women Are Hooked On Fly Fishing

 Women Fly Fishers on the Rise   After more than a decade of being a fly fishing guide in Utah, I have noticed an increase in one exciting, passionate population of anglers...

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Nymph Presentation

Tips on Fly Fishing with Nymphs Nymph fishing is an occasionally scoffed at by purists, but it's here to stay and is one of, if not the best ways to catch trout on a fly. Entire books can and have been written on nymphing.  For a great reference on fly fishing with nymphs we highly recommend George Daniels' Dynamic Nymphing.  George's book is a great detailed text, however, we wanted to also give a quick and easy guide to presenting nymphs properly.1- Try Fishing Upstream. Some nymph fishers only seem to fish across, but a great way to present nymphs without drag is by casting directly upstream.  This will usually allow a nymph to dead drift and, if it is weighted properly, bounce along the bottom into feeding fish.  This is a great presentation technique, but does take a good amount of effort stripping in slack line each drift and recasting the...

IF4 Coming to Utah

Join Falcon's Ledge at the International Fly Fishing Film Festival The International Fly Fishing Film Festival (If4) will be making its way to Utah again. It's a time for fellow anglers to get together and just have a fun night watching killer films about fly fishing. It's also a great time to come and meet some of the guys in the industry. We'll have shop owners, lodge owners, bloggers and fly fishing company reps in attendance. Tickets can be purchased at Eddie Robinsons fly fishing and Fishwest.The If4 consists of short and feature length films produced by professional filmmakers from all over the world. These films will capture the passion, lifestyle and culture of fly fishing. There will be a variety of films that will for sure get you excited to go fish. Below is the IF4 trailer giving you a sneak peek into what you can expect to see on March...

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Streamers

This week’s fly fishing quick tip is on streamer fishing.  Streamers can be a great way to catch big, predatory fish, and a great option when nothing is hatching.  Streamer patterns work especially well after a storm when the water is turbid and predatory trout are targeting baitfish.  Large brown, brook and cutthroat trout become very predatory when they get over 16 inches in size and streamers are a great way to imitate their main prey.Common streamer patterns include woolly buggers, muddlers, sculpins, shiners, crayfish, and leeches.The best streamer pattern to use varies widely depending on geographic area, elevation, and water body.  For example, crayfish mainly live in lakes, but sculpins live in rivers.  In order to determine the best streamer pattern to use in the water body you are fishing, hire a guide or stop by a local fly shop and they can help you pick out some streamer...

A Day Off With Stillwater Rainbows

A Day Off With Stillwater Rainbows There are times, though few, during the fly fishing guiding season when guides get a chance to fish together.  This usually occurs when client schedules line up just right so that two or three guides have a day off in between trips.  Such was the case last September when guides Spencer Higa and Derek Olthuis accompanied me to a favorite reservoir in Eastern Utah.  After a packed summer of guiding, we were eager to get away and do some casting of our own.   As most of our trips take place on beautiful small streams, I was looking forward to some spacious water and a chance to stretch out my cast as far as I could.  The drive seemed to take forever, but the day was perfect with blue sky and little wind. Upon arrival, we found the reservoir level was lower than usual, due to a...

The Phlamin Pheasant

Tim Jenkins has been very busy over the last few years. Between school and raising a family he has found time to sit down at the vise and create effective fly patterns. Once such pattern is the Phlamin Pheasant.  Here's a little write up about how he came up with the pattern. Also, Congratulations to Tim for completing his Phd in 2013. I originally designed this fly specifically for the Provo river. I wanted something that looked like a lot of different food items and that had some serious flash (as a fly tyer I have a flash addiction). In my experience a rusty orange color has worked extremely well on the Provo and a number of other rivers, so I set out to make a fly with a similar body style to that of a pheasant tail, except on a curved hook – I believe it makes the fly look...

Fly Fishing Quick Tip – Dry Dropper Rig

The week’s fly fishing quick tip is on fishing a dry dropper rig.  At Falcon’s Ledge we fish dry dropper rigs quite often.  The dry dropper rig is a great option when you have occasionally rising fish, but suspect or can see that there are more fish in the stretch you are fishing that aren’t rising.  It is also a great set up for simply prospecting for fish when you are fishing a stretch of river you are unfamiliar with or don’t see any rising fish.To set up a dry dropper rig simply tie on a high-floating dry fly to your tippet using a clinch knot.  Use a dry fly that is large and high-floating so you can see it well.  Also, be sure that the dry fly is one that you know or suspect represents well the water-born insects that live on the river you are fishing.  Next, tie...

Winter Fly Fishing Fun

Guides Jeff Lindstrom and Bryan Eldredge have a great day fly fishing on this beautiful winter day.  Jeff and Bryan show that fly fishing can be enjoyed at any time of the year, and not just during the warm summer months.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYBQNCJkwXk...