Beautiful Brown Trout

Here at Falcon's Ledge we love brown trout.  They are big, aggressive fish that are also beautiful.  Browns are hearty fish that adapt to most water conditions and nearly all of the rivers and lakes that we fish around Falcon's Ledge have brown trout living in them giving us plenty of opportunities to hunt for them.  We fish for them in mountain streams, tailwaters, large rivers, beaver ponds, lakes, and medium-sized canyon streams.  The habitats that brown trout live in are as beautiful and diverse as they are.We love to fish for brown trout year round.  In the early spring we enjoy targeting these beautiful, buttery fish with midges and nymphs.  In the late spring and through the summer and fall the hatches of mayflies, stoneflies, and caddis and the fall terrestrials bring these and other trout to the surface for months of dry fly action.  In the late fall...

A Great Start to Spring Fishing

[caption id="attachment_51981" align="aligncenter" width="648"] Spencer's first fish of the season.[/caption]The spring in Utah has been very unusual. The weather has been so unpredictable with sun one day and snow the next. Checking the weather forecast closely we chose a day with the least chance of snow or rain. We knew that the nice weather wasn't a guarantee but decided to head none the less. Fellow guide, Bryan Eldredge and I set out to fish a river that we had neglected all winter. We were excited and were hoping the water levels were fishable and that the fish were happy and feeding. We pulled up to one of our go-to spots and there were a few cars in the parking lot. We had to make a decision based on what we thought the other cars did. We decided to take our chances head upstream.Bryan was in guide mode immediately. He spotted the...

Spring Fishing in Utah

Spring fishing in Utah can be an amazing experience.  The valleys are lush and green with wildflowers everywhere and the mountain tops are still dusted with snow making the scenery unforgettable.  The cool mornings and warm afternoons make for some of the most comfortable weather of the year.  Fish are actively feeding and most days there are afternoon midge hatches and on a few rivers large blue-winged olive hatches.  A handful of the rivers fish great in the spring and most lakes in Utah fish better in the spring than any other time of the year.When April and May roll around every year I get excited as the ice recedes from the lake edges.  I get out the midges I tied during the winter and I get ready for some fast and furious fishing in the evenings.  Simple midge patterns such as zebra midges and disco midges can produce fish...

Evening Rainbows

A few nights ago as I finished work the weather was cloudy and cool.  I figured the weather was perfect for midges to be hatching on the local lakes and I decided to rush over to fish a lake near Falcon's Ledge and try to catch a few rainbows before it got too dark.  As I drove up to the lake I could see a few fish surfacing and I quickly rigged my rod.I first tied on a disco midge and tried a handful of casts, but the fish didn't seem interested.  I next tried a sno-cone chironomid, but no takers on that pattern either, so I switched to a size 18 zebra midge.  The zebra midge had on been sitting on the water a few minutes when a fish took it.  The rainbows that I caught that evening were fat, healthy and full of energy.  They ran me around...

Utah Native Cutthroat Slam Program

We are excited for the new Utah Cutthroat Slam Program!  Here is a short video that introduces the program.  Give us a call if you would like more information or need a guide to help you find these beautiful, native cutthroat trout in Utah. Visit the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources to signup.https://youtu.be/x2RmdTkMmM4...

Fly Fishing Tip: Look Before You Fish

Here is a great fly fishing tip from our friend Phil Monahan at Orvisnews.com.  Looking closely at the river, the river banks, and even the weather before you rig your rod and step into the river can help you know what is happening in the river and help you catch more fish. Here is a great list of things to watch for as you look at the river:Do you see any fish rising? Can you spot any fish holding or moving? Are there insects on the water? In the air? Crawling in the streamside vegetation? How is the water clarity? Is the water higher or lower than normal? Can you identify likely holding spots—behind current breaks, near structure, below riffles, etc.? Do you need to get in the water, or can you fish from shore? Is there a good place to get in the water that will avoid spooking fish and position you well to cast to...

Princess Nymph

As guides we are always looking for new flies that will fool fish. Especially the fish that have seen the same old flies over and over again. A few years ago fellow guide, Bryan Eldredge, introduced this fly to me called the Princess nymph. It's a variation of the prince nymph but has proved to be very effective on waters all over the west.The first time Bryan gave me one to try I kind of laughed. I'm used to fishing a prince nymph in size 14-18. The one he handed to me was a size 12. He even uses bigger ones than that. It wasn't long before I had a fish on the first few casts. I became a believer! The big fly is nice because it gets down fast with little split shot. We all know that getting the fly into the feeding zone is key to success. Apparently...