Monday Tip

Holidays are alway interesting when it comes to fishing and getting to your favorite areas. We always try to avoid crowds and for the most part we can do that. However, certain holidays are tricky and will make you think of doing things a little differently. As the 4th of July soon approaches here are some tips on avoiding crowds.1- Hike. It's pretty clear that most people that get out on the holidays are there for a short time so they want to get as much fishing in as possible. When this happens we arrive at the place we want to fish and hike upstream. It's usually not a huge hike but most people will just fish the most obvious and convenient areas. A little hike will go a long ways.2- If you don't want to hike or don't have the time then focus on areas that you normally don't...

Video: How to Get Your Nymphs Into the Strike Zone

Orvis product developer Jesse Haller, the guy in charge of flies and accessories, is a pretty active competition fly fisherman, and he’s big proponent of tightline nymphing. The technique, developed by European competitive anglers, is so effective because it gets the nymphs quickly into the trout’s strike zone and keeps them there. In his new how-to video, Jesse describes the three factors that affect how fast your flies sink–fly weight, tippet diameter, and how the flies enter the water–and shows you exactly how to set up and cast to maximize the time your flies spend in the strike zone.Written By: Phil Monahan...

Beaver Ponds

We often stumble upon beaver dams when fishing our streams in the Uintas. This can provide some great fishing if you know what to look for and how to fish it effectively. Most beaver dams will create a stillwater situation so most of the time it's a good idea to treat it like a lake especially if the fish are skittish. Here are some tips to keep in mind when fishing beaver dams.1- Be sneaky. Keep a low profile and be walk slow. Fish in beaver dams are used to predators and will be on the look out for anything out of the ordinary. Hawks, eagles and osprey are alway looking for an easy meal and beaver ponds provide that.2- Use longer leaders. We like to use 10-12ft leaders so the splash of the fly line doesn't spook the fish.3- Don't be lazy. Before you get to a beaver dam...

Classic Pro Tips: 3 Steps to Teaching Teens to Fly Fish

Teens are among the hardest groups to engage in a new activity. Photos by Will LillardBefore I led Lillard Fly Fishing Expedition’s first teen fly fishing adventure, I sat down for a beer with TU’s Director of Youth Education, Franklin Tate. We talked about the success TU has had engaging young kids with their Stream Explorers program, and the growing number of college students participating in TU college chapters. Then we talked about the challenges of engaging teens. Despite their efforts, TU has not experienced the same success with teenagers that they have enjoyed with pre-teens and college students. In the last few years, I have worked almost entirely with teens. During that time I have come to the conclusion that there is no shortage of teens who are willing to give fly fishing a try; the key is presenting and teaching fly fishing in a way that caters to them....

Video: Finding Clear-Water Trout in Murky Conditions

Dave and Amelia Jensen, of Jensen Fly Fishing in Alberta, have produced another episode in their “The Bank” series of instructional videos. Here’s Dave’s description: After 5 hours of walking up an increasingly murky side channel to a larger river that was being impacted by heavy rains in the high country, we finally came to the mouth of a spring creek tributary unaffected by rains. And cue the rising brown trout spotted in the sliver of gin-clear water. We watched a spell as the fish cycled round the clear water pocket, making moves that respected the brown’s movement, its visibility, and the sensitivity to its small, quiet habitat. Note the time we take in filming this sequence, how subtle the movements are, how deliberate each move is made, when the casts are made. The first cast was taken and the hook set was ok, but note how the head turns quickly...

10 Tips That Will Make You a Better Fly Fisher

Written By: Phil MonahanOne of the great things about fly fishing is that you never stop learning. No matter how long you’ve been at it, there is always another technique, style, or fishery to explore. Every day, we offer tips and tactics that will help make you a better angler. Here are 10 such useful tips to help you make the most of your time on the water. 1. How to Make a Delicate Presentation The secret to a delicate presentation is in controlling the rod tip. If you drop the rod tip too early on the presentation cast, the fly line doesn’t roll out completely and instead “crashes” to the surface. Instead, the rod tip should stop at or around eye level to let the loop roll out. Only then should you lower the rod tip. Tell yourself, “Stop, then drop,” and you should get a better presentation. —Peter Kutzer 2....

Video Pro Tip: An Easy Trick to Tie on a Dropper Fly

Tying on a dropper when you’re on the water can be a real pain for some anglers, as Steve Moore says of this video: “Tiny tippet, big fingers and small hooks all conspire to make this aspect of fly fishing difficult.” We’ve offered a couple simple methods for creating the standard hook-bend dropper knot–see here–but Steve shows another great way that makes use of your hemostat. I have found that, no matter the knot, there’s no method for tying it that works for everyone, so I always enjoy discovering new methods that will help more anglers be able to get the job done.Written By: Phil Monahan...

Quick Tip: Match the Hatch

As we fished one of our favorite rivers recently we knew because of the time of year there may be certain bugs hatching. We didn't know for sure so as we arrived to the river we observed to see if we noticed anything flying around. We didn't so we did the next best thing. We turned over rocks to see what was going on.The first rock we turned over we noticed a lot of small mayfly nymphs. We also noticed a few cased caddis stuck to the rock. This gave us a good idea of what was being washed down river for the fish. We turned over a second rock. We found what we had expected to see this time of year. Green drake nymphs. This was a good sign that this river was about to turn on. Also, you can for the most part get an idea when the...

Video Pro Tips: Understanding Fly Fishing Leaders

  </Over the past few weeks, we’ve posting a great new video series called “Getting Started in Fly Fishing,” from Brian Flechsig of Mad River Outiffters in Columbus, Ohio. In the last episode, Flechsig discussed how to choose the right fly line. Here, he moves to the end of the line system, explaining leaders and tippets. Do you know how to choose the right “X” leader to match your fly? You may be surprised by how important this is, not only to fishing, but to casting, as well. Yes, this is very basic stuff, but it’s extremely useful for folks who are new to the sport. The biggest barrier to entry for anyone taking up a new activity is lack of information. Stay tuned to learn more!Written By: Phil Monahan...

Video Pro Tip: Learning by Watching Trout Rises

See All Orvis Learning Center Fly Fishing Video LessonsMost of us are getting into prime dry-fly season now, so enjoy it while you can (or after runoff ends, depending on where you are). You can learn a lot about how to present your fly by watching rises for a few minutes before jumping right in with a cast. And don’t forget: the old cliché, “Make your first cast count,” is as valid today as it was a long time ago when Lewis Coleman first wrote it....