Video and Story: “Overboard” on the Green River

It’s 2011. I’m on Utah’s Green River shooting my first film for Trout Unlimited. The Green is a marvelous blue ribbon running through red rock. I need to see every stretch of it because there’s a pipeline proposal floating around. It would move the Green across the Continental Divide to water Denver. I’m here to document what the Green looks like pre-pipe, research how a pipeline would change that look and explore just how deep this river runs in the West’s veins. It doesn’t take me long to find depth. It’s in the stern, gaze of Walt Gasson and the strong stick strokes of Charlie Card. “Take three seconds to look around at where you are,” says Charlie Card, Green River fly fishing guide. “This is pretty good.” I once had a Colorado guide suggest I spend the day in his lap, as that provided the best angle, in his opinion. Of course,...

Video: How to Tie McKenna’s Sexy Walt’s Worm

In this week’s video from Tightline Productions, Tim shares a great attractor nymph that’s designed to work pretty much anywhere trout swim. It’s a variation of the Sexy Walt’s created by Dave McKenna. This one is really easy to tie, as well, not even requiring any of Tim’s fancy tricks. So twist up a few of these and try them wherever you fish–at home or on the road.McKenna’s Sexy Walt’s Worm Hook: Black nickel jig hook (here a Fulling Mill FM50 45), sizes 12-16. Bead: Pink slotted tungsten bead, 3mm. Weight: Lead-free round wire, .020. Thread: White Veevus 10/0. Rib: Silver wire, small. Body: Gray SLF Dubbing. Thorax: Hot purple SLF Prism Dubbing. Hot Spot: Fluorescent red thread. Adhesive: Head cement. Tools: Dubbing wax.Written By: Phil Monahan...

FL Guides Head to New Zealand Part 1

A few of our guides headed to New Zealand recently in search of big trout and adventure. In heading out on a trip like this there are a few things to remember when planning. Here is a check list of things to remember when planning a trip of a lifetime.1- Do your research on the areas you plan on visiting. Make sure you talk to whoever you need to to get the most up to date information. Fly shops are a good source of information but remember to patronize the shop when they give information.2- Make a list of items you will need and check them off once completed. It sound simple but it will ensure you will have the stuff you need when you need it.3- Don't cut corners on gear. Make sure you have the best gear you can afford. If you don't know how long you've had...

Video: How to Tie the DPD Nymph

In this week’s video from Tightline Productions, Tim shares a great generalist nymph that’s designed to imitate a wide range of insects and to sink very quickly through the water column. The DPD Nymph is a productive early-season pattern that gets to where the fish are . . . quickly. As usual, the tying process includes a couple cool tricks, including the way that Tim rearranges the hook in the vise to make tying in the tail easier, as well as the way he finishes the fly without tying off the thread.DPD Nymph Hook: Partridge Czech Nymph hook, sizes 14-16. Bead: Black Nickel Cyclops bead, 7/64-inch. Weight: Lead-free round wire, .020. Adhesive #1: Fly Tyers Z-Ment. Thread: Brown, 70-denier or 8/0. Rib: Copper wire, small. Tail: Wood-duck or mallard flank-feather fibers. Abdomen/Wingcase: Rusty brown pheasant tail fibers, trimmed. Thorax: 2 peacock herls. Legs: Wood-duck or mallard flank-feather fibers. Adhesive #2: UV-cure resin. Tools: Plunger-style hackle pliers, sticky note pad....

Pro Tips: How to Fish an Inside River Bend

When you’re fishing a bend in a river, work the water close to you before you cast to the real “lunker water” against the far bank. Start from the tailout and work upstream, beginning at the tailout (A). Next, look for trout near any rocks or structure on the inside of the main current (B). Oftentimes, there will be fish lying right out in the open on the inside of the bend (C); these fish are usually quite wary, so you need to be stealthy and make delicate present- ations. Finally, look for fish at the head of the pool (D) where there are rocks that break the current. Illustration by Larry Largay, courtesy American AnglerMost fly fishermen are so intent on their own processes — making the right cast, mending correctly, and watching the fly or strike indicator — that they don’t bother to observe what the other anglers on the river...

How to Photograph Fish

We all love showing off our recent catches to our friends and family. It's fun to capture the memories of that one fish that jumped 10 times or took you into your backing so getting a photo of a fish to tell a story is essential. Over the years with clients we like to educate them on how to handle fish but how to handle one for a photo. This is a topic that we like to talk about to keep it fresh on our minds. Our main goal is to do whatever we can to keep the fish safe. Here are a few tips for taking photos of your fish.1- Keep the fish in the net in the water before the photo2- Only when the photographer is ready lift the fish gently above the water3- Only keep the fish out 3-5 seconds at a time.4-If more shots are wanted...

Classic Tuesday Tip: How to Unravel a Knotless, Tapered Leader

Do you ever have trouble getting a new knotless, tapered leader from the package to the end of your line? When I was a guide, I used to watch anglers struggle with this all the time. Sometimes they’d end up with a tangle bad enough that they’d just grab a new leader and start over. At about $4 a pop, that’s an expensive mistake if it happens often enough. The truth is, unraveling a prepackaged leader is quite simple if you know a couple of tricks. Here’s a technique shown to me by my friend Macauley Lord one day on the banks of the Rapid River in Maine. You should never ruin a new leader again! The keys to success are (1) an understanding of how leaders are packaged and (2) taking your time. If you rush the process, your chances of screwing up increase significantly. Even if there are fish rising...

Tom’s Top 7 Early-Season Streamers

This springtime rainbow was holding in deep water below a highway bridge in western Massachusetts. Photo by Joe PhillipsWritten By: Tom RosenbauerIn Tuesday’s post, “How to Fish Streamers in the Early Season,” I explained that I prefer flies that have some movement of their own, like ones with marabou and rabbit fur, because they work best and have the best action when you’re fishing them slow. Flies with brass (or even better tungsten) beads get the fly deeper in a hurry, and color does not seem to be that important—although black in dirty water and white or yellow in clear water seem to offer some advantage. Change colors if you don’t get any strikes but don’t worry too much about pattern, size, or color. A size 6 or 8 fly that wiggles in the current should work fine. Here are my 7 go-to streamers for high, cold water:Moto's MinnowConehead Bunny MuddlerTungsten...

Classic Pro Tip: Stretch for Success

If you haven’t been out fishing for a few months, weeks, or even days, chances are that your line has settled into a series of coils from being on your reel for so long. When you peel line off the spool, you can see how the line’s “memory” causes it to coil on the ground. (The core and coating characteristics of the line and the air temperature determine how much memory a line exhibits in this situation.) Line memory is a problem for two reasons: when the line travels through the rod guides during casting, it doesn’t travel in a straight line, and the rubbing of the coils against the guides introduces unwanted friction that means you have to work harder to get line out. This limits your ability to shoot line. Once the line is on the water, it won’t lie straight, so there’s unnecessary slack between you and your...

Pro Tips: 10 Ways to Get Your Nymphs to the Bottom

Even though the quintessential fly-fishing image involves casting dry flies to rising fish, we spend considerably more time presenting flies underwater to fish we can’t see, and beginning fly fishers learn pretty early in their experience that trout feed on or near the bottom most of the time. This raises an important question: How do you ensure that your nymphs are getting down to where the fish are? The speed of the current, the depth of the water, and the drag of your fly line and tippet all conspire to keep flies away from the trout’s feeding zone. Here are a few ways—ranging from simple to complex—that you can ensure that your presentations are reaching their targets. 1, Use weighted nymphs and streamers. The traditional way to weight a nymph was to add a few wraps of lead wire as an underbody (there are now lead substitutes available), but some modern...