Fly Selection

Sometimes it can be difficult to know which fly to use when arriving on the river. If it's a river you frequently fish it's not as hard but for those times you get to a new river or just a river you don't fish on a regular basis here are some simple tips on how to choose which fly to use.1- Observe your surroundings. Look around and see if you notice any bugs flying around. Another way to know if there are bugs around is to watch the birds.2- Check size and color of natural bugs. It can make or break your day by choosing the correct color and size of the natural bugs. I've seen more times than not when a hatch starts and I'm matching the hatch that if it's not the correct size the fish will refuse it. It's not always the case but it's a good...

Video Tip: How to Fish a Lake with a Fly Rod

Here’s another great how-to video in a new series from Arizona Game and Fish and former Orvis Fishing Manager Cinda Howard, who now runs Fly Fish Arizona and Beyond. In this episode, Cinda and her fishing buddy, Jules, are after cutthroat trout on Big Lake, in the White Mountains. She explains how to find the fish, how to rig to drift midges under an indicator, and how to fish leech patterns. If you plan on doing some stillwater fishing, this is a great introduction.Written By: Phil Monahan...

Video Tip: How to Fly-Cast in Heavy Brush

The best trout are often in places where other anglers don’t even attempt to make a cast. In this video, Dave Jensen shows you how to cast in heavy brush, using the steeple cast and also a modification of this useful fly cast. The steeple cast does not need to be a major effort, with your arm way up over your head. Watch how easy and relaxed it can be. And Dave also shows you how to keep your back cast very high by maintaining a fixed arm at a high horizontal angle, then using mostly your wrist (Heaven forbid!). Watch for further installments of Master Class Monday every week at Orvis News, in the Advanced Tactics playlist our You Tube Channel, and on the new Advanced section of the Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center. ...

Amazing Tiger Trout

Here at Falcon's Ledge we are fortunate to have a few areas where we can catch tiger trout. We get questions all the time about when and where is the best time to target these fish. Although you can catch these fish all year round the best times we've found to target them is in the spring and fall.It seems that when the water is cooler is when they become active. Ice off is a great time to catch tiger trout. The water is cold and the fish are hungry from a long winter with few bugs hatching. We normally catch them sub surface with nymphs and chironomids. Since we're fishing lakes for them chironomids and other midges are their main food source. When the tigers are getting aggressive we'll also throw streamers. They will chase down a streamer right at your feet when they're aggressive.During the summer months the...

Video Tip: How to Fish Undercut Banks

Today’s video is another exclusive Orvis video by Dave and Amelia Jensen, in which they show us the ins and outs of finding and catching trout around undercut banks. Learn where these trout live and how to approach them. As usual with the Jensens, there are some great shots of hooking large trout—except in this case they are not in New Zealand but on their home waters in Alberta. And, no, I won’t tell you where these rivers are located, so don’t even ask.Watch for further installments of Master Class Monday every week here at Orvis News, in the Advanced Tactics playlist our You Tube Channel, and on the new Advanced section of our Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center.Written By: Tom Rosenbauer...

Classic Pro Tip: How to Mend Your Line For a Better Drift

Tom explains why a fly-line belly on the water is bad. Photo via the Orvis Fly Fishing Learning CenterIn today’s video tip from the Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center, Tom and guide Molly Semenik discuss basic mending. As Tom notes, many anglers seem confused by mending because it seems so obvious and intuitive. The only way to get good at it is to practice on the water, dealing with currents of different speeds. Your fly will tell you if you’re doing it right: a long dead-drift is a sure sign of successful mending, while a “motorboating” indicator or fly dragging across the surface points to some problems. Here are 5 tips to help you achieve good mends:1. Mend as soon as the fly line touches down. Once the line settles on the water, it bonds to the water’s surface. If you try to move the line after it has bonded, you...

Video and Story: “Overboard” on the Green River

It’s 2011. I’m on Utah’s Green River shooting my first film for Trout Unlimited. The Green is a marvelous blue ribbon running through red rock. I need to see every stretch of it because there’s a pipeline proposal floating around. It would move the Green across the Continental Divide to water Denver. I’m here to document what the Green looks like pre-pipe, research how a pipeline would change that look and explore just how deep this river runs in the West’s veins. It doesn’t take me long to find depth. It’s in the stern, gaze of Walt Gasson and the strong stick strokes of Charlie Card. “Take three seconds to look around at where you are,” says Charlie Card, Green River fly fishing guide. “This is pretty good.” I once had a Colorado guide suggest I spend the day in his lap, as that provided the best angle, in his opinion. Of course,...

Video: How to Tie McKenna’s Sexy Walt’s Worm

In this week’s video from Tightline Productions, Tim shares a great attractor nymph that’s designed to work pretty much anywhere trout swim. It’s a variation of the Sexy Walt’s created by Dave McKenna. This one is really easy to tie, as well, not even requiring any of Tim’s fancy tricks. So twist up a few of these and try them wherever you fish–at home or on the road.McKenna’s Sexy Walt’s Worm Hook: Black nickel jig hook (here a Fulling Mill FM50 45), sizes 12-16. Bead: Pink slotted tungsten bead, 3mm. Weight: Lead-free round wire, .020. Thread: White Veevus 10/0. Rib: Silver wire, small. Body: Gray SLF Dubbing. Thorax: Hot purple SLF Prism Dubbing. Hot Spot: Fluorescent red thread. Adhesive: Head cement. Tools: Dubbing wax.Written By: Phil Monahan...

FL Guides Head to New Zealand Part 1

A few of our guides headed to New Zealand recently in search of big trout and adventure. In heading out on a trip like this there are a few things to remember when planning. Here is a check list of things to remember when planning a trip of a lifetime.1- Do your research on the areas you plan on visiting. Make sure you talk to whoever you need to to get the most up to date information. Fly shops are a good source of information but remember to patronize the shop when they give information.2- Make a list of items you will need and check them off once completed. It sound simple but it will ensure you will have the stuff you need when you need it.3- Don't cut corners on gear. Make sure you have the best gear you can afford. If you don't know how long you've had...

Video: How to Tie the DPD Nymph

In this week’s video from Tightline Productions, Tim shares a great generalist nymph that’s designed to imitate a wide range of insects and to sink very quickly through the water column. The DPD Nymph is a productive early-season pattern that gets to where the fish are . . . quickly. As usual, the tying process includes a couple cool tricks, including the way that Tim rearranges the hook in the vise to make tying in the tail easier, as well as the way he finishes the fly without tying off the thread.DPD Nymph Hook: Partridge Czech Nymph hook, sizes 14-16. Bead: Black Nickel Cyclops bead, 7/64-inch. Weight: Lead-free round wire, .020. Adhesive #1: Fly Tyers Z-Ment. Thread: Brown, 70-denier or 8/0. Rib: Copper wire, small. Tail: Wood-duck or mallard flank-feather fibers. Abdomen/Wingcase: Rusty brown pheasant tail fibers, trimmed. Thorax: 2 peacock herls. Legs: Wood-duck or mallard flank-feather fibers. Adhesive #2: UV-cure resin. Tools: Plunger-style hackle pliers, sticky note pad....